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Little Known Ways Knitting Can Decrease Anxiety

Knitting may be seen in a whole new light thanks to research that suggests it may help improve physical and mental health. Studies say relaxing calming hobbies such as knitting or crochet can help people control health concerns such as memory loss and anxiety. Even those suffering from eating disorders may benefit from completing such hobbies. Here are 4 reasons why you should consider visiting your nearest crafts store to invest in some yarn:
1. Knitting by yourself or in a group setting can encourage feelings of happiness and tranquility. Researchers from the British Journal of Occupational Therapy detect relations between happiness, calmness, and knitting depending on how often a person engages in the activity. Group settings encourage communication and social interaction with others that may improve overtime. There are books that discuss therapeutically knit processes people can learn. You can read about how the process helps reduce stress, while others say it gives them spiritual and emotional strength as a fulfilling activity.
2. Knitting and meditation have a few things in common. Medical researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine learned that blood pressure gets reduced when people practice activities similar to meditation. When a person practices repeated actions through movements, phrases or words such as yoga or tai chi, knitting fits in the same category and offers the same benefits. This is because they all encourage the body to produce a calming reaction.
3. Knitting can ease anxiety fears. A study analyzed psychological states of participants who engaged in knitting. Almost 75 percent who participated said they experienced less fear and were able to clear their minds due to being preoccupied. The same effect was reported in participants who experience anxiety and eating disorders.
4. Knitting can decrease memory loss. A study conducted by Mayo Clinic suggests brain exercises may reduce the risk of memory loss. Relaxing activities such as quilting, knitting and reading can be more beneficial when conducted as a social activity. Individuals around 50 and older can reduce memory loss risk that develops during the 70s and 80s by a third. The Mayo Clinic study suggests individuals in their 70s and 80s can still benefit from such actions even if they haven’t engaged in them in the past.
If you haven’t thought of knitting yet, here’s a recap of why it can be good for your overall health and well-being. The biggest boost you get from knitting is through the rhythmic motion you’re engaged in—which has been proven to change the brain chemistry, decreasing bad stress hormones and increases the feel good hormones such as serotonin and dopamine. Knitting can be really fun and even US politician Madeleine Albright and celebrities such as Goldie Hawn and Russell Crow have taken knitting as a hobby. Creative crafts such as knitting engages both your mind and body and produces positive feelings about yourself and your future.

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