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Honey, Can You Sign For My Viagra?

bottle of viagra

There’s nothing embarrassing about going to your doctor to get Viagra, right? For a man it only involves admitting that you cannot function in the definitional way in which a man does. That is, admitting to another man, or worse, another woman, specific details about intimate physical relations between two adults in a relationship; furthermore, in many cases, the sanctity and privacy of a state-recognized marriage.

An Ohio state senator is looking to change the definition of privacy when it comes to dealing with impotence on grounds that seek to defend the sanctity of religious beliefs. (That is, as opposed that of the aforementioned privacy.)

Democratic state senator Nina Turner’s proposed mandate for Viagra users would see would-be users prove their impotence with medical exams and affidavits from their partner before they can procure a prescription from a doctor.

“This isn’t about restricting [Viagra],” she told the Toronto Star on Wednesday, looking to clarify possible misconceptions. “We are purely looking out for men’s health and well-being so they can fully understand their options.”

Turner explains she is only looking out for Men’s Health, presumably in the same way that men look out for (and some have argued intrude on) women’s health. After all, this legislature comes piggybacked onto the birth control debate, a polarized topic which is currently raging in the (Southern) United States.

(If you are just catching up, Republican hopefuls Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney are spearheading a charge against President Obama’s health care plan on the grounds that including contraceptives as part of the (tax paid) package impedes on the religious freedoms of those for whom contraceptive is an affront. In other words, the freedom to opt out of, or demand changes to taxes that do not coincide with a given religion.)

Turner’s (be it genuine or not) proposal is one more polemic flame to a fire that is threatening to grow beyond reasonable social temperatures.

Turner explains that Bill 307 would require men to “have a long conversation with a sexual therapist to determine whether or not this is physical or mental.” The second step is to head back to the doctor’s office for a clinical test. Finally, step three is a notarized confirmation from the spouse or sexual partner confirming the alleged impotence.

Turner believes that these steps will work to support men who have perhaps not considered that there are advantages to stepping through the arbitrary hoops she has erected. That is, as opposed to continuing with the traditional process that does not involve signed documents about sexual dysfunction.

For Turner, impotence is a topic that, for one reason or another, directly correlates to the larger debate: “I see birth control, abortion and Viagra as all part of reproductive health.”

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